Charcoal and Safflower Petal Yogurt Soaps

As you can see, I’m all about yogurt these days. I just love the way it feels in soap, it’s great at moisturising and refining the skin, and because of the lactic acid that turns into sodium lactate when mixed with lye, the resulting soap is hard and does not melt easily in the shower. What’s not to like about this amazing ingredient?

1. Yogurt and Safflower – I saw little bags of these dried safflower petals in the spice section while grocery shopping and thought it would look pretty in soap.  (Since I started making soap, going to the grocery has never been the same!)  Safflower petals are primarily used as a natural colorant in food, sometimes called the poor man’s saffron.

I steeped the petals in a small amount of hot water to draw out the colour. The liquid turned orange, but obviously I didn’t use enough petals – I can barely see them – and the color didn’t stand a chance in the high ph environment. I still like the way it came out very natural looking. Fragrances used were lemongrass for the safflower portion and grapefruit for the top.

Safflower Yogurt 1

Safflower yogurt 2

2. Yogurt and Charcoal – What could be better than pairing 2 of my favorite soap ingredients? This would be great for oily and pimple-prone skins.  Charcoal draws out toxins while the AHA (alpha hydroxy acid) and zinc in yogurt act as a natural skin exfoliant and pimple treatment, respectively.  But you don’t need to have oily skin to use this soap. It is very moisturizing and hydrating because of the whole milk yogurt. I scented this with Soapy Clean – a moderate trace accelerator.  Smells really fresh and clean!

yogurt charcoal

yogurt charcoal 4

yogurt charcoal 2

 

 

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21 thoughts on “Charcoal and Safflower Petal Yogurt Soaps

    1. soapjam Post author

      Thank you, Tanya! Because of this blog, borne out of a newfound love for soap making, I am also learning and enjoying photography. 🙂

      Reply
  1. Jenny

    Both soaps are very pretty! I’ll have to try yogurt in soap one of these days – I hear such wonderful things about it. I like the looks of the yogurt/charcoal combo. It sounds like an awesome facial soap!

    Reply
  2. Roxana

    Beautiful soaps! I really, really, really like the tan and charcoal. The charcoal just pops! I had to laugh at the comment about going to the supermarket not being the same now. That’s my problem. I go to the market and see different possibilities and I go to the craft store and all I see are new molds! =) LOL

    Reply
  3. soapjam Post author

    It’s a pleasure to hear your comment, Roxana. I wholeheartedly share your sentiment. All I can think about is soap and everywhere I go, I see soapabilities! LOL! 🙂

    Reply
  4. Katy

    Your soaps are just gorgeous, Silvia! You’ve inspired me to make some yogurt soap! I googled how to make yogurt (anxiously awaiting your post on how you do it!), made some this weekend in my crockpot, and it’s in the freezer now awaiting my next soaping adventure! You’ve also talked me into getting some charcoal. I had no idea it was so good for so many things!

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      Thank you and welcome to my blog, Katy! I’m so happy to hear that I’ve inspired you to make yogurt soap, my absolute favorite so far! You can take any favorite soap recipe to make into yogurt soap. I make a 50:50 lye:water solution, and use yogurt for the rest of the liquid. I don’t freeze the yogurt. Instead, I blend it with the oils first before adding the lye solution. I let my soap gel because I don’t mind having an off-white soap. You will find that yogurt soaps tend to get hot quite fast, but it still gives you plenty of time to swirl or make designs. I think you will really like charcoal, both as a beneficial additive and as a colorant. Please ask if you have any more questions. Happy soaping! 🙂 p.s. I will do a post on how i make yogurt in the next few weeks, but the crockpot method is popular and works too.

      Reply
  5. Katy

    Thanks for the info! I’ll try making it that way. It sounds easier than the freezer way, too! I’m experimenting with different methods for making milk soaps right now, so this is great! I always gel my soaps, too, milk or not. I like the way it looks and feels, plus I don’t honestly have the freezer space to put a big soap mold in it!

    Reply

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