Rice Water Fil-Castile

A friend of mine introduced me to making porridge with glutinous purple rice, and ever since then, I would buy a small pack whenever it makes its sporadic appearance in the supermarket. The high amount of amylopectin is responsible for its sticky quality –  yielding a thicker and richer porridge compared to one made with regular rice.

As I was preparing to cook some glutinous purple rice last month, I remembered reading somewhere that rice water, or the water used for washing rice, was good for the skin and has been used by Chinese and Japanese women for centuries.  Without doing much research, I went ahead and soaked rice in distilled water at a 1:1 ratio.

Purple Rice 7

Purple rice water

I also had some shikon roots going through a second infusion. It was much lighter than the first infusion so I thought if I used it together with the purple rice water, I might get a lavender-colored soap.  Wanting to keep things simple, I decided to use these 2 ingredients in my 2-oil Fil-Castile formula.  And instead of my usual unscented Fil-Castile, I added essential oils of lavender and rosewood (all-natural blend since the real thing is endangered and too costly.)  At the last minute, I added bamboo charcoal to have some kind of design for the top.

Purple Rice 1

Purple Rice 3

In stark contrast to the dark purple colour that I got with my Shikon and Bamboo Charcoal Soap, this second-infusion batch had a greenish hue when it was wet, and dried out to a greyish bone colour.  The colour I had hoped for was not there, but it smelled nice and expensive. 😀

Purple Rice 2

Purple Rice 4

I finally got to test a bar a few days ago.  It was slimy, pasty, and barely bubbly.  If I really wanted to, I could create a little lather by coating my hands with wet soap and rubbing them together for a few seconds.  But if I just glided the bar on my body, there was no lather and the soap was so slippery that it kept jumping out of my hands. Because I like using soap with a good lather, this soap rates low in usage pleasure, but it leaves my skin feeling very soft.  My conclusion is that I used the wrong type of rice, but rice water is certainly good for the skin.

As for my sticky purple rice porridge, it was delicious. After cooking it and adding enough water to make it into the consistency I wanted, I seasoned it with a little himalayan salt, added coconut milk for richness, and coconut nectar for sweetness. I forgot to include it in the photos, put I also like to sprinkle it with toasted Japanese sesame seeds, either the white or black variety. Yum.

Purple Rice 5

Glutinous purple rice, coconut milk, coconut nectar/syrup, himalayan salt

Purple Rice 6

Glutinous purple rice porridge.

 

 

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35 thoughts on “Rice Water Fil-Castile

  1. Natalia

    Love the ingredients, Silvia! The soaps looks beautiful! And that porridge looks delicious!
    I also used (black powdered) rice in soap and I remember that the soap was one of the most wanted at that moment! And since I discovered how healthy this rice water is, I use it as démaquillant: cheap and good 😉

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      I was wondering if soaking rice powder in water would be the same as soaking whole grain rice in water… I have tried using brown rice powder mixed with my oils and it provides a gentle exfoliation. Your black rice soap sounds fantastic! I wish I could see s photo of it.

      Thanks for reminding me, I will try to save the water for washing rice to wash my face. 🙂

      Reply
  2. Madame Propre

    It is a shame rice water does not last, you really have to make it every other day! I think I made soap with rice water long ago, but slightly cooked. I remember the soap traced veryyyyy fast, but I do not remenber what it was like when cured!
    It is surprising how dark your shikkn is! It is supposed to be the equivalent of madder’s root, which can be pinky-mauve in a light proportion….
    Your soap looks so smooth…. It is just perfect!

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      Perhaps it’s time to make rice water soap again. 😉 I would love to see your results.

      I was surprised too with how dark the shikon soap came out. Could it be the acidic yogurt that I added? Anyhow, I really enjoy using the shikon soap and the color becomes more obviously purple as the soap is used. 🙂

      Reply
    2. 949Basics

      I freeze the rice water from each time we cook rice. Enough is measured out for a batch of soap, poured into a Ziploc bag, and tossed in the freezer. My husband hates that my soap projects take up valuable freezer space, but the frozen packets make whipping up a batch of soap super quick. When I’m ready to make a batch, I simply crack the frozen packet in to small chunks with a meat tenderizer mallet, into my container it goes, and lye gets sprinkled on. It melts within minutes, and I have lye solution that is cool enough to work with.

      Reply
      1. soapjam Post author

        Thank you for the tip! Was wondering if the water you are talking about is the soaking water or the water that’s cooked with the rice? While I always cook my rice with just enough water, I’ve learned that some people cook rice like pasta – draining the excess water.

        Reply
        1. 949Basics

          It’s actually rinse/soaking water that I use. I have considered cooking congee/porridge and saving that water to make soap but am concerned it would cause the soap to trace sooner than usual. If anyone has experimented with cooked rice water, I would love to know your results.

          Reply
  3. Annina

    Hi, for what I read about this soap, should it be treated like a salt soap? Lots of coconut oil to get nice bubbles? Anyways it looks wonderful

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      Hi Annina. Thank you for your comment. 🙂 I use the same formula with distilled water without any problems. Adding more coconut oil would make it more bubbly but I was going for a very gentle soap to be used for the face. Someone suggested that I should cure it longer than a month. I will try that and see if it becomes less slimy. 🙂

      Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      Thank you, Darlene. 🙂 I am still using my bar despite the lack of lather. Haha! And I have warned the people I’ve given the soap to what to expect. 😀

      Reply
  4. Monica

    Thanks for the reminder about rice water being useful, even if I don’t use it on myself, I’m sure the plants would appreciate the extra goodness from the rice water.

    Your soaps are so beautiful! I’ve said it before, but you have such a delicate touch in making your swirls, they are always so ethereal.

    The sticky rice porridge looks yummy! wonder if I can find purple glutinous rice here, or is it only to be found in Asia?

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      We consume a lot of rice here but we just throw out the water. So true, we should give it to the plants. Thanks for the idea! 🙂

      You are always so kind with your words. I really appreciate it, Monica. 🙂

      I am pretty sure you can find purple glutinous rice in an Asian store or in Chinatown. Sometimes you have more asian ingredients there than we do! I am actually jealous. :p

      Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      Thank you, Heather! First infusion shikon (madder or alkanet roots are close substitutes, I’ve read) produces a nice purple gray color. What I had for this soap was too weak and diluted. I think your idea of using rice water in a rebatch or HP soap is great! I am planning to explore HP a bit more. Thanks for the suggestion! 🙂

      Reply
  5. Jenny

    Using rice water in soap is a very interesting idea. I’m sorry to hear that the lather was disappointing, but it is a beautiful soap, Silvia!

    Reply
  6. Gordana

    Looks gorgeous! Regarding the lather it is interesting that rice water does not boost it (I would also think contrary) but anyhow it is always the matter of personal preferences. The grate thing here is that this soap is so grate for the skin!

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      I am thinking maybe the type of starch in glutinous rice weighs down the lather. I should try using brown rice water to see if it makes a difference. And as someone suggested, give it a longer cure. 🙂

      Reply
  7. EvelynRoseSoaps

    It turned out so pretty! Maybe it will get better like the earlier comment suggested? 🙂 I make a bastille soap that is 70% olive oil, and I let it cure for at least 4 months otherwise the lather is almost nonexistent. I cut off a slice every 2 weeks to wash my hands with. After 4 months, it had a nice creamy lather, but sometimes it does take a couple of weeks longer.

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      As suggested, I will let it cure longer. 🙂 It is interesting with your Bastille soap… I thought curing makes the soap harder but I didn’t know that it also improves lather. Thank you, Heather! I love learning from all of you! 🙂

      Reply
  8. Yvonne Bækgaard Pedersen

    As always, beautiful soaps and pictures. I make Lavender soaps, my favorit, and I put them in small organza bags – the bag provide a lovely lather and a gentel scrub when used & not slippery…. Another good thing is that I can hang them in the shower and they will dry between use 😊

    Reply
  9. Anne-Marie

    These soaps are so lovely =) Thank you for sharing. I’ve tried potato water and about every kind of infusion possible … or so I thought! Though slimy lather makes me think that rice water may not be my favorite type of soap =) By the way, that stamp is stunning!

    Reply
  10. Vicki

    These are so beautiful Silvia! Yes, I second what others have said – I’ve always understood that Castile, and (to a lesser extent) Bastile soaps too, should be cured for at least 6 months, with people even saying that curing for a year (!!) gives the best result. To be honest that ‘slimyness’ has put me off trying a Castile in the past, but it’s on my list of ‘Must-dos’ – a right of passage for any soapmaker 😀

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      With a steep water discount and the addition of 5% virgin coconut oil, the soap is very hard after a month of cure and doesn’t feel slimy. I hope you get to try it, Vicki… I also have my list of Must-Do’s and it just keeps on growing! LOL! 😀

      Reply
  11. Maja

    I don’t know what I could say that I hadn’t said earlier. Love your precise cut lines and neat design.
    No,I haven’t used rice water (as I remember) and I’m curious whether you’ll find a difference comparing to your regular fil -castille bar (btw, what’s ‘fil’?).

    Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      This one is vastly different from my regular Fil-Castile, but I think it’s because I used the wrong type of rice. Fil is for Filipino, because of the coconut oil component. I just made up the term. A lot of people use the word Castile loosely. But I am a purist and would only use it for 100% olive oil soap. 🙂

      Reply
    1. soapjam Post author

      Ooh, purple rice pudding sounds delish! I find that the purple rice water makes the soap too slimy. Maybe the soaking water for long grain white rice or brown rice might be better.

      Reply

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